Second Single – “Quarrel”

Happy to announce that my second single, Quarrel, was released this week! You can stream and download on all platforms! Here are a couple:

SPOTIFY

BANDCAMP

What they’re saying so far:

The Autumn Roses
“Written soulfully in the Parang style native to their home of Trinidad & Tobago, “Quarrel” is a well of wisdom and the poetic, epic new single from Brooklyn’s Nikkie McLeod.”

SKOPEMAG
“The new single from Afrofuture artist Nikkie McLeod is a swirling storm cloud of trial and tribulation breaking into overcoming resolution. “Quarrel” is a ballad in the form of Parang music, a traditional folk blend from Trinidad & Tobago. Its steady rise and fall captures each breath McLeod pours forth from an aching soul. The title-track is off the upcoming EP, which is a dedication and tribute to their late mother and younger brother, whose birthday is September 8. Quarrel (EP) is out October 30 in honor of their mother’s birthday.”

Both “Quarrel” and “Deep Cry” are on this really dope playlist – CHECK IT OUT!

Finally, I’ll be starting off my three month residency at Williamsburg Music Center this Sunday, September 9th, 9PM.

QUARREL, the album, comes out October 30th, which is also the release show date at Rockwood Music Hall!

 

Interviewed on BTR’s Music Digest

Spoke a little about Deep Cry, and my upcoming album, Quarrel, on Break Thru Radio’s podcast Music Digest (click on image above for link). It was such a pleasure being on the show. It was also really hard discussing the story behind Deep Cry and the album… Give it a listen, as hosts JLM and BRYAN B shared some awesome music by artists new to me! Thanks again for having me Music Digest!

 

DECAY

EYES ON THE ELBOWS
Album art: Nikolaus Schuhbeck

Eyes On the Elbows’ debut album Decay is far from a state of festering decomposition, since on every track you see colors dancing in a sometimes fury escape of wild emotions, to a slow disappearance of a strange moss that is plantae. Maybe the idea is that, within decay there is growth, movement, since decay itself is organic matter. In which case, Decay, the album, achieves this process of transcendence, as it uses many popular niches of previous soundscapes, zeitgeists, what have you, and reinvents them. Well of course, the band itself is not even a band, but a very diverse community of musicians coming together by exact chance for jam sessions. This experience is possibly very reminiscent of the collective Broken Social Scene, the exception being, Eyes On the Elbows sound is taking, involving, not only the decay of indie music, but music that was once popular, that are now worn and cast aside into the ether.

Decay begins with Broken Country. A creeping guitar, nostalgic in its purposeful delivery, time travels to when punk and post-punk was a thing, and bands like the Gang of Four were rebelling against the superstructure. Broken Country enlightens and links this commonality of the social and political ills of society to as far back as when “civilization” began. This seems evident with the well placed medieval, grand opera, vocals mixed alongside tribal drumming. We return to the 20th century with the introduction of jazz saxophone, which not only marks a new and different musical direction for Broken Country, but as well demonstrates how much that has been learnt, “discovered,” but yet socially things are exactly the same. The presence of the accelerant nature of contemporary technology further amplifies how drastically behind social progress is against technological advancements.

This imbalance is sharply recognizable in Decay’s second track, Raise Your Heads, as the song’s usage of contemporary tools manically implodes, explodes, and finally collapses. Raise Your Head’s hinting of the musical genre Jungle and its derivative, Drum and Bass, demystifies, rejects, and welcomes the idea of the drum-machine. The ghosts of the past are rediscovered and are digitally dressed up in the song’s refraining chant: Raise your heads above your phones. The song passionately expresses extreme, dangerous anxiety, which is pretty much how we avoidingly exist. The suggestion in Einstein’s famous quote is immensely felt: I fear the day that technology will surpass our human interaction. The world will have a generation of idiots. His fearful posit exposed something far greater than idiocy, but more indicative of the growth of complex irrationality.

We are brought back to the breath on Subterfuge, as the song invites everything that is ignored. The breath existing in this sound waits, allows for gills to respire, for photosynthesis to be discovered. The patience held in every motion, alive in each phrase as subtlety flutters, are the whys we want to communicate with each other. In the simplistic vocal phonetic of Subterfuge’s initial tum tum tah, it describes the wonders of internal beauty, small galaxies under-discovered. Larger than the confusing guile of what is presented, these small galaxies in tum tum tah are given realization, to acquaint themselves, dream even expansively further than a passage of the allowed kind of acceptance that is “journey.”

Subterfuge’s sudden ending destroys the found cohesion of the breath. The introduction of the thickly synced riff of the horns with the heavy bass on Thirteen (when I Was) nomadically drags an uncertain travel. Uncertainties that are richly layered, hypnotically romantic enough for intrigue. The bass’s wide-reaching risk of a recurring evocation reveals an existing foreboding in its distorted melodies. There is nothing safe about this wandering. It is perspicuously suspect, even in the voicing of the horns’ fleeing mirth; there still is devastation.

California Chill is comforting, especially with its wanting to relieve that hunger for reciprocity. Lampooning its glee, the song plays upon the bright shimmers of appearances, while there is a sickening buried deep within. Its rhapsody is almost a Shakespearean soliloquy, a scene of falsehoods displayed as cinematic fashion that is a mirage, a “vision.” The lethargic dream like guitar riffs déjà vus an action to wake up, but its repetitive executions is a defeatist attack against a consistent sleepwalking, a chemically altered state. California Chill expresses an addictive want for a panacea, as it liquidly glaze effortless ease.

The parody does not end with California Chill, it continues in the less sophisticated track Ptandr’usk. Ptandr’usk’s lack of sophistication has everything to do with the song’s deliberate efforts at expressing buffoonery. What better way to do this, but by listening in on a conversation between two teenage boys speaking in German about their exploits at a party. The seriousness of their account is the butt of the joke, as the song’s instrumentation indulges and teases this dialog, while simultaneously snickering on the side. The use of droning techno give rise to this experience, as the environment slips from being in a video arcade to a club, where the walls are a living pulse; where all inhibitions are abandoned, and one cannot help but lose themselves in a wild dance.

Responsive to Ptandr’usk’s buffoonery, So What Do You Want returns to Decay’s unchanging narrative: the search for clarity. It moans a very human condition; the experience of loss resonates from the onset of its introduction. The barrenness of its instrumentation spotlights a core of soulful longing, which the bass and drums drives forward. Their rhythm and blues riff patterns maintains a grounding for the vocals and other instruments to delve into and investigate. So What Do You Want begs for answers in its tonality, and its lyricism portrays this predicament.

Decay ends its kaleidoscopic undertaking with the instrumental track Not The Best of the Evenings. The track attempts to thread a closure for all the avenues, alleys, vestiges existing in the album. Even though Not The Best of the Evenings’ jazz fusion style is an intellectual endeavor for closure, it does not pretentiously reconcile Decay’s conundrum. It however brings about more ceaseless questions, but it appears that there is a level of placidity with this acknowledgement, which is completely satisfying.

You can stream the entire album here:

A First Stroke of Passenger Peru

Uncommon to commonplace trends, Passenger Peru‘s self titled album subtly dismantles the norm, and engages with teases, licking  a familiarity only when necessary. You are a passenger on their quest. For sound that will rearrange thought processes for listening to and discovering devotion and discipline, I learned so much from this record.

I remember the night I first was introduced to these guys. They were Pet Ghost Project then, and I was so enthralled by their attempt to create something exceptionally special, that I bought all of their cds. The delicate attention to detail that I was waiting for back when they were Pet Ghost Project is now fully expressed in this new direction, where it’s just the two core members of Pet Ghost Project: Justin Stivers, and Justin Gonzalez.

With just Justin Stivers on bass, and Justin Gonzalez on guitar, they eliminated the need for a live drummer/percussionist with great success. You’ll understand what I mean, if you ever go to one of their shows.

Anyway, I’ll be playing Passenger Peru to its entirety on the next Broad Strokes hour with Calypso Sally, Wednesday, August 29 at 8:00pm on Washington Heights Free Radio (WHFR). The band will be present to answer any questions I, or you may have.

Broad Strokes, Wednesday, June 27 with special guest Fables

The next Broad Strokes episode on Washington Heights Free Radio (WHFR) is scheduled for next Wednesday, June 27 at 8:00pm with special guest Fables. The electric duo Fables will be playing a live acoustic set in WHFR’s studio.

Fables

Also, last month’s Broad Strokes was a blast. Listen HERE, see below for the playlist.

Playlist

Intro by Gary Clark Jr.
Fitta Happier by Quakers
Dark Horse by Other Lives
Rise to the Sun by Alabama Shakes
Outro by Gary Clark Jr.
Blood by The Middle East
Hustle Bones by Death Grips
Black Fractal by The Netherlands
Alternative Power to the People by The Dandy Warhols
Other People by Beach House
Disparate Youth by Santigold
The Night by School of Seven Bells
Deeper by THEESatisfaction
No Hands by Mirel Wagner
Steamship Authority by Father Figures

Bringing you stories, live events, and much more, WHFR tries and remains independent of any corporate sponsorship.  So, if you like what WHFR is doing, you can donate by contacting us at info@whfr.org.  DIY forever baby!

The Meaning Of Life and I.

I haven’t been posting as regularly as I use too… Things change, again and again, but anyway, here’s what I’ve been up to:

Broad Strokes 2012

It has been awhile since the last Broad Strokes broadcast… Broad Strokes is still alive and kicking it! In fact, there’s a show this Wednesday, February 29 at 8:00pm on Washington Heights Free Radio (WHFR). The first show for the year! And what better way to start your Broad Strokes listening off with a First Listen of new music.

This first show of Broad Strokes will test the waters of 2012, featuring new music by the band The Catskills. Presently, a nomad Americana band that you may have known as Object. Nomad, because after the release of Object’s EP, Tomorrowland, band members Eric Kramer and Maria Schettino decided to flee the out of control high stress, and accelerating rent of New York.

They freed themselves of their Brooklyn home, equipped with a practice and recording space, for the open air and more room to truly reflect. A reflection that translates a simplistic longing, that doesn’t beg for approval. Their music now, as Catskills, expresses the generosity that you’d find gripping you at night. Love exists between them, that a lone wolf wanders, and hopes to find in a howl.

Calypso Sally will be your conductor, as we travel and ask hard questions about putting out a record outside the Mecca of record making New York.

Bringing you stories, live events, and much more, WHFR tries and remains independent of any corporate sponsorship.  So, if you like what WHFR is doing, you can donate by contacting us at info@whfr.org.  DIY forever baby!

A Young Composer Dares Us To Listen.

With its complex guitar melodies, and thunderous drumming, Magnetic Island’s self-titled album has revolutionized the Riot Grrl sound of the 90s and taken it to higher heights. Because of the Riot Grrl movement we have such great women fronted bands like Magnetic Island, who thereupon help propel the genre further by fusing punk, experimental rock, etc. taking us deeper than simple chords and or fills.

Magnetic Island, under the direction of one of indie rocks best female guitarist, Lisa Liu shows her aptitude to not only play the guitar extremely well, but also demonstrates qualities of a brilliant composer.  This brilliance is manifested in part by the fact that Liu, a new comer to the drums, played all of the percussion parts for the album, in addition to guitar, vocals, bass and Rhodespiano.

The time is now, blaze the drums, but not in an overbearing manner, Liu’s drumming is clear and precise and works with each song, complimenting every accent of the guitar and vocals. A sense of equilibrium reigns throughout the album as each instrument is well arranged to benefit the overall sound. The songs are driven by the guitar and drums, with bandmate SMV’s vocals and undercurrent melodies on the keyboard. Nothing is accidental or by chance, and every layering of sound has a purpose, and successfully fulfills its positioning, making Magnetic Island one of the most well composed albums that will surely be a contender for best of 2012.

A First Listen of Let Fall the Sparrow’s self titled EP

The gorgeous vocals, the bass with a voice of its own, the lonesome guitar that is perfect for winter, and the precise drumming makes you want to listen to Let Fall the Sparrow on repeat. I know I did. This post-punk trio elevates what it means to play an instrument, and also what it means to be a songbird.

The well balanced experimental structure of Let Fall the Sparrow‘s self titled EP makes you think differently about music today. If you ever stop playing the track, For Those Things That Are Past, you will feel exposed to a grandiose conviction that musicianship can mingle with raw passion. You wonder if is it now you will experience what it truly means to delve in the mist of composition… Composition that is unlike many of the bands today. Let Fall the Sparrow is clearly not beggars wanting to be listened to and validated, they’re about the negotiation of sound and how even in its chaotic sense can formulate a pattern, if one just listened carefully.

Broad Strokes with Calypso Sally on Washington Heights Free Radio (WHFR) will bring you a first listen segment of the band Let Fall the Sparrow‘s self titled debut. We will also have a chance to talk to the band’s bassist, Lilly Pritchard, live from San Francisco. So tune in next Wednesday, November 16 at 8:00pm.

Also, if you missed last month’s broadcast when Teletextile brought the house down to silence, completely (first time for everything), you’re still in luck, since you can listen to the broadcast HERE.

Bringing you stories, live events, and much more, WHFR tries and remains independent of any corporate sponsorship.  So, if you like what WHFR is doing, you can donate by contacting us at info@whfr.org.  DIY forever baby! Broad Strokes’s Schedule:

If you’re in a band or you know a band and or singer/song writer that would like to do a show, contact me at: roarplanet@gmail.com.

Holy Moly on Broad Strokes this Wednesday, ooh la la

I know it’s been awhile since I’ve posted anything substantial, but I’m still here. Thinking about writing and not having enough time. Anyway, I will be on the air this coming Wednesday, June 29 at 8:00pm for my radio show Broad Strokes on Washington Heights Free Radio (WHFR). With me this month will be the alternative/folk band Holy Moly.

I saw these guys at one of NYC’s best DIY spots Fort Useless awhile back and they are truly amazing.

You can listen to last month’s broadcast HERE. Learn how to learn HERE.

Last month’s Playlist:

Cannons by Little Scream
Wish I knew by Magnetic Island
Night Nurse by Gregory Isaacs
Calgary by Bon Iver
Zebra by Beach House
Amnesia by Blu
Where Will I Be by Emmylou Harris
The Sparrow Looks Up at the Machine by The Flaming Lips
In a Strangeland by Talk Normal
Drinking Again by Aretha Franklin
Over You by Raphael Saadiq
Ribbon by She Keeps Bees
Holy Holy by Wye Oak
Cyrstalised by The xx

Bringing you stories, live events, and much more, WHFR tries and remains independent of any corporate sponsorship.  So, if you like what WHFR is doing, you can donate by contacting us at info@whfr.org.  DIY forever baby!

Also, if you’re in a band or know someone who is, and would like to be on the show, please email me at roarplanet@gmail.com.

Art Exhibit and Broad Strokes

So, I put together a night of art with two amazing visual artists, Renee Valenti and Esther Hidalgo. It’s a mixed media exhibit with provocative post-modern paintings and avant-garde photography. We see through the eyes of these two women, as their work deals with the convergence of people, relationships, past and present.
 
Opening Night: April 1st
Time: 6:00 – 10:00 p.m.
Musical Guest: Libel
Where: Fort Useless, 36 Ditmars Street in Brooklyn, one block from the Myrtle Avenue/Broadway stop on the JMZ trains.
 
Esther Hidalgo likes to use antique and vintage processes to create contemporary works.  She received her B.F.A. in Photography from the Corcoran College of Art & Design.  Her photographs have been displayed throughout the East Coast and in private collections across the country. She lives and works in Washington, DC.
Artist statement: “You Were Here” is an on-going project documenting scenes of development and urban decay primarily throughout Washington DC. These compositions, taken between 2004 – Present, are meditations on urban life and the intersection between that which is known and forgotten. www.estherhidalgo.com.

Renee Valenti is currently working toward her B.F.A. at Pratt Institute and is looking forward to graduating in December 2011. Previously, she had been pursuing a career in acting, and has enjoyed the cross-over of performing to visual arts, but also seeing ways how they can influence each other. She lives and works in Brooklyn, NYC.
Artist statement: I have been working with recurring topics like relationships and sexuality, day to day human experiences and connections, or disconnect, with others. In some of these works the personal experience of life in the crowded urban environment, particularly New York, has definitely come into play. The squishiness and fluidity of oil paint on canvas, paired with classical techniques has been what I enjoy working with most; however I also explore other mediums such as paper and photography. www.reneevalenti.com

 

In other news, I will be on the radio, Washington Heights Free Radio (WHFR), this coming Wednesday, March 30 at 8:00 p.m.

I’ve been in a downloading craze lately, mostly Soca and Calypso, but there’s also some Dub, and Indie Music, maybe even metal. Lol, we’ll see on Wednesday.

In the meantime, you can listen to the interview with Mindy Abovitz, Editor-in-Chief, and founder of TOM TOM Magazine, a magazine about female drummers, HERE scroll down to listen.

Bringing you stories, live events, and much more, WHFR tries and remains independent of any corporate sponsorship.  So, if you like what WHFR is doing, you can donate by contacting us at info@whfr.org.  DIY forever baby!

Also, if you’re in a band or know someone who is, and would like to be on the show, please email me at roarplanet@gmail.com.

Broad Strokes Wednesday, February 23 @ 8:00 p.m.

 Live Wednesday, February 23 at 8:00 p.m. on Washington Heights Free Radio (WHFR)‘s Broad Strokes, Calypso Sally will have special guest, Mindy Abovitz, Editor-in-Chief, and founder of TOM TOM Magazine, a magazine about female drummers.

 

Broad Strokes streams live off the web every last Wednesday of the month at 8:00pm. I, Calypso Sally, that’s me, try to play a broad range of genres, stretching from indie rock, pop, alternative, noise rock, hip hop, reggae, dance hall, metal, calypso, funk etc.  It’s sort of a mixed bag.  I also have live acoustic performances. But this month I have media extraordinaire Mindy Abovitz in the house.

She’s going to talk to me about TOM TOM Magazine, women taking over the drum world, the music scene in NYC versus abroad, and how open the media has been with a woman taking on a  predominantly male environment.  Full throttle, however, she is wiping out the old school mentality!

Mindy Abovitz is a musician and media maker from South Florida currently residing in Brooklyn, NY. She has an undergraduate degree from the University of Florida and a Masters in Media Studies from the New School for Social Research. She has been playing drums for 11 years and has taught at Rock Camp for Girls and Vibe Songmakers. Before starting Tom Tom Magazine, Mindy was an engineer at East Village Radio, worked at Main Drag Music, threw music shows at her loft The Woodser, and played drums for Taigaa, More Teeth, The Good Good, and other Brooklyn bands. In 2009 she started Tom Tom Magazine: A Magazine About Female Drummers because there wasn’t one and media representation of female drummers was poor. She has since put out 5 issues of Tom Tom and plans on putting women musicians in the front and center of the media because that is where they belong. She currently drums for Chica Vas.

Broad Strokes this Wednesday, January 26 @ 8:00p.m.

I’ll be doing my radio show, Broad Strokes, this Wednesday, January 26 @ 8:00 p.m. on Washington Heights Free Radio (WHFR). This will be my first broadcast for the year so check it out. Learn how to listen HERE.

You can listen to last month’s broadcast HERE.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Last month’s playlist

Tell ‘Em by Sleigh Bells
Moving In (Remix) by Pink Noise
Memo to the Man by Zach Hill
Transparency is the New Mystery by Marnie Stern
Trouble! by Turbo Fruits
Just for You by Object
She’s Long Gone by The Black Keys
Next One is Real by Pink Noise
Inspiration Prod. Kev Brown by Epsilon Project
Sprawl II (Mountains Beyond Mountains) Arcade Fire
Apologetic Shoulder Blades by Baths
I Walked by Sufjan Stevens
Slow by Twin Shadow
My Girls by Animal Collective
You Go, Uno by Kan Kick
What Does Your Soul Look Like (Part 4) by Dj Shadow

Bringing you stories, live events, and much more, WHFR tries and remains independent of any corporate sponsorship.  So, if you like what WHFR is doing, you can donate by contacting us at info@whfr.org.  DIY forever baby!

Also, if you’re in a band or know someone who is, and would like to be on the show, please email me at roarplanet@gmail.com.

Double Dose of Broad Strokes

Last month I did my radio show, Broad Strokes,  on Washington Heights Free Radio (WHFR), and it was a lot of fun.  I spent probably three hours listening to my collection, trying to find the right songs to play. I hope you enjoy what I came up with, listen HERE.

 

 

 

Playlist

 Sun by Caribou
Tightrope by Janelle Monae
Sprawl II Mountains Beyond Mountains by Arcade Fire
Hell’s Bells by Cary Ann Hearst
Maximalist by Baths
Sung (Not Said) by Magnetic Island
Normal by Envy
In the Fall by Future Islands (Featuring Katrina Ford)
Would Know by Mount Kimbie
Sleepless In Silver Lake by Les Savy Fav
Just For You by Object
Natural Selection by UNKLE (Featuring The Black Angels)
Aminals by Baths
Lady Daydream by Twin Sister
Junveniles by The Walkmen 

In August, I invited the experimental noise band The Boy With The Ice Cream Face to play an acoustic set, and they were fantastic. There’s banjo playing involved. You can listen HERE.

I’ll be on the radio again this coming Wednesday, October 27 at 8:00 p.m. with special guest:

She Keeps Bees

Rock duo from Brooklyn. These guys are awesome, I completely recommend tuning in. To listen go HERE.

Bringing you stories, live events, and much more, WHFR tries and remains independent of any corporate sponsorship.  So, if you like what WHFR is doing, you can donate by contacting us at info@whfr.org.  DIY forever baby!

Also, if you’re in a band or know someone who is, and would like to be on the show, please email me at roarplanet@gmail.com.

Broad Strokes

Last month I did my radio show, Broad Strokes, on Washington Heights Free Radio (WHFR), and it was a blast!  I was so relaxed, and perhaps even funny. 

I really enjoyed the playlist I came up with.  I think it’s probably one of my best. 

Anyway, this show is dedicated to Paul Squires, an amazing poet and friend who passed away recently.  Miss you Paul, you were the lantern in the darkness. 

Read his blog, it’s amazing.  

You can listen to the me, Dj Calypso Sally, here: Broad Strokes.

Bringing you stories, live events, and much more, WHFR tries and remains independent of any corporate sponsorship.  So, if you like what WHFR is doing, you can donate by contacting us at info@whfr.org.  DIY forever baby! 

Here’s the Playlist:

Love Me Girl by Yeasayer
Turn It Up Prod. Supa Koopa by Epsilon Project
Ni Una Sol Vez by Spouse
Chase the Tear by Portishead
D.A.N.C.E by Justice
Living in America by Dom
Before Your Birthday Ends by Suckers
Let Love by Res
It Is Not Meant to Be by Tame Impala
Subterfuge by Magnetic Island
Tin Man by Future Islands
Cloudy Shoes by Damien Jurado
Reminiscences by Ariel Pink Haunted Graffiti
Never Gonna Give You Up by The Black Keys
Infatuation by The Rapture

I will be on the air again this coming Wednesday, August 25 at 8:00 p.m. with the band, The Boy With the Ice-Cream Face.  The name of this band reminds me of a William Carlos Williams poem: The Red Wheelbarrow

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 The Red Wheelbarrow

so much depends
upon

a red wheel
barrow

glazed with rain
water

beside the white
chickens

 

 

 

Boy with the Ice-Cream Face will be playing a live acoustic set, so check it out.

Also, if you’re in a band or know someone who is, and would like to be on the show, please email me at roarplanet@gmail.com.

Broad Strokes with Calypso Sally on WHFR

Last month, my radio show, Broad Strokes, streamed live off the web on  Washington Heights Free Radio (WHFR).  Despite my obvious nervousness,  the show went well.

For those of you that don’t know,  I have a radio show and it’s called Broad Strokes, and it streams live off the web every last Wednesday of the month at a new time 8:00pm.

I, Calypso Sally, that’s me, try to play a broad range of genres, stretching from indie rock, pop, alternative, noise rock, hip hop, reggae, dance hall, metal, calypso, funk etc.  It’s sort of a mixed bag.  I also have live acoustic performances.

Speaking of live performances, the indie rock trio Coyote Eyes will be playing a live set on Broad Strokes next Wednesday, June 30, at 8:00pm.  Check it out.

Last month’s Playlist, and listen here:

They Built a City In My Country Mind by Pet Ghost Project
I Don’t Love You No More by Kings Go Forth
Tigallo For Dolo by Little Brother
Promises by The Morning Benders
Tales of Stage Fright by Pet Ghost Project
Forced to Love by Broken Social Scene
Do it Again by Galactic
Electric Car, Gas Guitar by Dinowalrus
Chrome Depot Freestyle Blade Mix by Apathy
Medula Oblongata by Buke & Gass
Yellow Red by Coyote Eyes
The Greatest Light is the Greatest Shade  by The Joy Formidable
Cataract by White Hinterland
Anyone’s Ghost by The National
See it All by Fink
Peripatetic by Pet Ghost Project

Bringing you stories, live events, and much more, WHFR tries and remains independent of any corporate sponsorship.  So, if you like what WHFR is doing, you can donate by contacting them at info@whfr.org.  DIY forever baby!

If you’re in a band or you know a band and or singer/song writer that would like to do a show, contact me at: roarplanet@gmail.com.

Subterfuge

I’ve been working with Magnetic Island, an exprimental, indie rock band based in NYC, on the single Subterfuge.  

This past week the single premiered on Gimme Tinnitus.  You can check it out here: Subterfuge

Not only did I play the drums, and the steelpan on the single, I also sang!

It was so great being back in the recording studio, and playing in general.  Even though at times it was a challenge, I learned so much from the experience.  

Working with Magnetic Island was really refreshing as the sound is completely different from my band Telenovela Star

I think the difference is that I was more focused on percision rather than power.  Less concerned with trying to prove how fast I can play or how much agility I have, but more concerned with how to bring out the song, make it tell the story that it’s dying to say. 

Working with these guys also gave me the opportunity to break out my steelpan, which has been sitting in my closet for sometime now, and as well as to sing.  Being brought back to my first instruments, my voice and the steelpan, reminded me of why I desired to be a musician.  I was blown away.  I didn’t realize that I was capable of expressing myself through these other mediums, especially singing.  I realized that I can do more than carry a tune.  I have a voice.  I can sing. 

All in all this was an eye opening experience for me, and I’m thankful to have had the chance to work with such talented, and genuinely remarkable musicians.  They brought out a side of me that was starving to be explored.

Here are some shots of us in The Fort recording studio:

 

A week of radness.

This week started off, well, great. I went and saw a show at the Knitting Factory, on the mother of all school nights, Monday.  But, it was an opportunity to listen to Object‘s new works live, catch-up with friends, and then as a cherry on top, reaquaint myself with The Netherlands.

The Netherlands is a power trio out of Brooklyn, NYC.  I saw them maybe about two years ago, when the line-up included a female bass player, now changed to a dude on keys. 

They were on my 2008 list of bands I totally dug.    And I’ve been meaning to see them perform ever since that one show when they had blew my mind, so much so I bought all their cds. 

With their own sort of pyshedelic, punk, soulful grunge rock, you might suffer a head or neck injury from head thrashing to their music.  

Here’s the video I made of the Netherlands using my Flip:

I took a few shots:

Magnetic Island

 

On Wednesday, I had my radio show, Broad Strokes, on WHFR

 This month, I invited Magnetic Island, another fave of mine, to play a live acoustic set and they were freaking awesome. 

So gifted, just this week Magnetic Island dropped a demo that you can check out at Cash Music, and you can listen to the Broad Strokes broadcast here

Object on Broad Strokes

Last month, I invited Object to play live on my radio show, Broad Strokes, and it was pretty awesome to say the least.  They played an acoustic set with all new songs, and as I type, one of these new songs is being mixed for their next album!

What I love about these guys, one of the many things, is that they are so incredibly talented, sincere, and down to earth.  Okay that was three.  They are definitely good people, and great musicians.  

Today, while listening to the acoustic set, I thought if I had never seen them live and I just heard this acoustic recording,  I wouldn’t  expect the all encompassing swell of sounds from their electric live sets.  That’s how adaptable they are.  They can move to any element with ease, and without pretense.  All in all, Object can play some rock and roll.

Anyway, I’ll be hosting another Broad Strokes hour live on Washinton Heights Free Radio(WHFR), this Wednesday, March 31, at 9:00pm.    New tunes to feed the soul!

Bringing you stories, live events, and much more, WHFR tries and remains independent of any corporate sponsorship.  So, if you like what WHFR is doing, you can donate by contacting them at info@whfr.org.  DIY forever baby!

To listen to Object’s acoustic set and interview go here.

You can also read the Tom Tom (a magazine about female drummers) interview with Maria here.  She was featured as drummer of the week in February!

And if you haven’t had enough of my obvious obsession with OBJECT, you can read this.  Hey, I like what I like for reals.